11.04.2008

bite size art


I've been sadly absent from this portion of the blogosphere lately. But I finally have a bit of pertinent news to share. My class is having another show. This semester they've been making work around the sort of sub-genre of Mail Art known as Artist Trading Cards. Their work will be on display in one of the Museum School galleries from the 11th of November through the 23rd, with a reception taking place on the 17th. In addition, the class is hosting an ATC workshop/swap during the night of the reception, with oodles of cardstock, collage materials, and other stuff provided to make and trade your very own ATCs. Anyway, here are the specs:

Bite Size is an exhibition of Artist Trading Cards made by students in SMFA's Text & Image Arts class 'Art from Ephemera: Mail Art and the Internet.'

Students in this intermediate level multi-media studio class investigate the emerging art form of Artist Trading Cards, one example of the many ways Mail Artists exchange ephemera using the postal system and the Internet. Artist Trading Cards are individual art miniatures that are traditionally traded, not sold, and are created as unique works or small limited editions. The only restriction is that they measure 2 ½ by 3 ½ inches.

Artists whose work will be on display include: Alexis Avedisian, Keina Davis Elswick, Omer Elad, Eric Erdman, Max Falkowitz, Maryn Leigh Kaplan, Jessica Scott-Dutcher, and Roxy Sperber.

Bite Size will be on display in the Mission Hill Foyer Gallery at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston from November 11 to 23, 2008.

A reception for the artists will be held on Monday, November 17th from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. There will also be a workshop and swap held at this time where you can make and trade your own Artist Trading Cards. Cardstock and other materials will be provided; bring your own materials and supplies to share.

SMFA's Mission Hill Gallery is located at 160 St. Alphonsus in Boston.

1 comment:

moodiesfan said...

If anyone would like to know more about artist trading cards and their history, or how to make artist trading cards, they may also be interested in a couple of articles that I've written.